Skip to main content

About your Search

English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
the synergy that is gained of all the services in order for us, nor to meet our nation's needs and the synergy and balance necessary to move forward and it limits the new strategy. one of the issues i have come when people do an evaluation of the army, look at brigade combat team, how many brigade combat team compounded when you for the future. that's important to that's fundamental to what we do. however, people tend to forget many other parts about the army that is so critical to us supporting the joint force. first, 75% of the operational forces special operations forces is army. can't forget about that. we are responsive camera to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and for the example we continue to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we provide a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographic combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense to all geographical combata
off the magnet. .. who are using undocumented workers. that will cut down the flow by about 90% of the border. that makes it possible to secure the border for those that are trying to come across for nefarious purposes for criminals enterprises. we can stop them at the border. then we say to those that are here in an undocumented status you are on probation paying a fine and this is to me what i find when i talk to people the most emotional issue in all of this is language. i find americans across the generations don't want us to have to sing the national anthem in two languages at the world series. they won the national anthem in english even if they were american. so they have to agree if they want to stay here permanently they have to agree to read, write and speak english. i find that among the undocumented workers they have no problem with this. they want to learn english. they understand that to live the american dream they have to learn to speak english. it's only liberals who inhabit college campuses and education departments who have a problem with english becoming the
's a pleasure for us to have with us this morning chief of staff of the united states army, general ray odierno. general ray odierno is from new jersey. anybody who is from new jersey these days is a little bit distracted by the front of the storm. i grow up in louisiana and we are sort of use to this thing that we don't usually have a hurricane. we have a windchill and snowfall so it complicates matters a bit. i hope everyone is all right of there this morning. we have been doing this series recently focusing on where in the military service is going so it's a very important point of history. general odierno started in the army not in the last drawdown but the one before that, the one after vietnam and those just coming and we have been talking about drug downs for some time now. we are now at the cusp of ones and we don't know how long, we don't know how far and how deep but there are a lot of lessons. there there are a lot of ways in which is this is different it has ever been before historically. the way we are going to lay this outcome i would like you all to make sure you turn off your ce
with his problems which was great that spin too much time trying to make money. >> a useful friends with him? >> i never said anything about him. >> as we go, you have an unusual hobby. you, something unusual. >> i have a collection of backers. also have a collection of airsickness bags. one thing i do ask people who come to the meeting, very helpful if you are traveling, you have an airsickness bag which the free present government afghanistan air sickness bag, so it is a great collection and somebody mentioned years ago in a profile starting in an e-mail, this is -- and odd quirky thing i did. >> what is the mood at the meeting going to be? >> people are very optimistic. people were disappointed because we didn't have the house senate president and then people thought we were going to get the president in the senate and stock didn't go up. we elected a house stronger than the last one. the president got elected to four years, lost two seat in the senate but would you rather have 60 or 15 or more than 40? more than 40, enough to filibuster, not enough to pass something which is whe
be in the situation we were in, we felt safe and comfortable there and i feel like my father wanted us to have an education, he knew that education was the key to a better life but i really think he thought all of us would come back home and try to work from there. >> you can watch this and other programs online at >> gene robinson of the episcopal diocese of new hampshire's and first openly gay person elected to be episcopate presents his arguments for gay marriage. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you. i think of cambridge as a very sophisticated place but surely you have better things to do on a friday night, really. i am delighted that i was your choice tonight. i am really very honored and it is a special privilege to be introduced by patrick. he is one of my favorite people in the whole world and he is doing some great things and if you haven't bought his book, by it now. is fantastic. welcome. we have pds people here? yes. any harvard people here? yes, oh yes, okay. i am really pleased to be doing this book right now. i have to admit i didn't have time to write
that is the case. >> under the previous government, officials used discretion to refuse to provide information to people who are brought up in care about the cases. will the deputy prime minister look to open the file of the people who were brought up in care, can find out what happened to them? >> deputy prime minister? >> i think is right in saying i think all of us, given a daily drip drip effects of these horrific revelations seem to get worse every day taking place on a scale that was before not unimaginable. we send out a clear message, all sides of the house to any victim of sitting at home alone, still harboring these terrible memories and this terrible suffering that they endured, that this is the time for them to speak up if this is the time for them to come forward. we will help them. will reach out to them and make sure that their suffering is a tone for and where we can find those who perpetrate these terrible abuses, that they're brought to justice, even several years since my first occurred. [inaudible] has misled the public. [inaudible] people in scotland are losing faith. does
out an electoral victory. we'd like to welcome everybody who's joining us now on c-span2. if you're on c-span 1, you have to switch over. if you had a friend that didn't switch over, run over there, pound on that door. you can join us at, there's an e-mail that will come directly to us onset. we're going to bring you into the conversation. it's 10:00, the polls have closed in most of the states that will determine the outcome of this election. i would say if you wanted to step back and where do we stand at 10:00 on election night, the big headline, the one headline we know for sure, joe donnelly won the senate seat for democrats in indiana, a huge and what unexpected victory for democrats, makes it almost impossible for republicans to win back the senate. we have declared long ago that the house will stay in republican hands, it now looks like the senate will stay in democratic hands. so it's all down to the presidential race about whether or not we have a status quo, divided government in washington. the early states that have been called are very much looking in ba
to join us today. susan is the bureau chief of usa today where she writes about the white house and national policy and won a slew of awards for distinguished reporting on the presidency, but brandon smith memorial award for deadline reporting on the presidency and coverage of the presidency and a lot of other awards. use a regular guest hosts of the diane beam show on pbs and cnn and many other broadcast outlets. a native of wichita, kan. she received a bachelor's degree from northwest and journalism from columbia where she was a pulitzer fellow. she will be followed by vicki edwards to is electorate at princeton university's woodrow wilson school of public policy international affairs. .. great pleasure to be here with the four people for whom i have so much admiration and the wife quoted so much time and so many stories. i have i think a little bit of news which is i found out the title of the next book that is coming out between tom so you can figure out the 1992 book by renewing congress. it sounds pretty positive. 2000, the permanent campaign. okay maybe not entirely posit
those are of us in delaware look forward to look working with you to recover and rebuild as always better protect ourselves from future storms that are likely to come our way. thanks. >> thank you very much, senator. senator cardin. >> i would like my entire statement to be included in the record. thank you so much not just for convening this hearing but for your leadership in dealing with these issues not only in responding to the needs of the communities and individuals who are impacted by these winter events but your leadership directing this committee to look at ways in which we can make our communities less vulnerable. sandy was a devastating storm. many lives were lost as a result of the storm bond seven in my state of maryland. eight billion people on the east coast of the united states at some time were without power at the results of sandy. maryland fare much better than our surrounding states. we sent a lot of our resources to help our friends in new york and new jersey and other states that were impacted, but it was the severe storm for the people in maryland. the high s
for us compete, first we had forces in carriage, and we had cars, now we are in a global marketplace. i was just in california last week and we need to compete across the country that involves investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. to talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, that is important. but we will not be competitive in the global marketplace we don't focus on it here at home. >> moderator: charlie summers? summers: our government has not been able to work together because of what everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax reform that makes sense. inefficiently accumulates revenue and is evenly distributed. what we need to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the misallocation of resources that we see to our government, as for instance in benghazi, when they drew down thousands of marine from iraq. we can have more independence there to make sure that the parties know that there is someone else available to take their place. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question rig
.. that is really a surrogate for a lot of things many of us would like to see with respect to climate policy, energy efficiency gets you in the same direction. and as the senator said, that is something on which congress has demonstrated as recently as the last five or six years that it can come together, and i think it could do it again and in a more aggressive way to get advantage of the opportunities which we now know that we have. some states have already experienced it and by the way some of the regulars of electricity like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to energy providers, electricity providers to provide more efficiency to the ed vintage of the consumer by to reducing rates so there are many things we would be able to agree on and advance the cause of the carbonizing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move thos
just describe it. by the way, i wish you had not reminded liberals that many of us don't think they've done so well in trying to destroy me because more than any book i've ever written, i have never had a book so ignored by the mainstream media. [laughter] i always make -- this is one thing i changed my mind about. i've maintained ferociously liberals can't learn that if you cut taxes, there's revenue to the treasury, can't learn it doesn't work to coddle and suck up to terrorists, but, apparently, they can learn if they attack ann coulter, she sells more books. [laughter] i love those gals on "the view," and i wanted to kiss them all before i left. [laughter] you know, i realize that people who are familiar with the actual history of civil rights in america or who have read my books notice that they had not read the books, but that was great because they believe everything the "new york times" believes, but the new york times won't argue with me. at least the gals on "the view" will argue with me. the summary of the book is white guilt never produced anything good, and don't make t
will be moderating the panel. the novelist will be joining us later. ms. kaplan will also be speaking, the founder of the miami book fair, introducing and opening the weekend coverage. in just a minute we'll take you now to chapman all. it's rather full. we will be beginning or coverage varies and. we are live on book tv. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. i had a little bit too much coffee is morning. it is a pleasure to see you. we are delighted to welcome you to the first session this saturday morning. how are you today. [applause] as you know, this is one of the most exciting times for us in the fall season in miami, and we are thrilled with this morning's panel. first and foremost, we would like to thank everyone who helped make this impossible, including our sponsors as well as blue florida and our volunteers. before we get started now would like to ask everyone to please turn of
of progress in a networked age" use the tere pure progressive. what iss that? >> guest: is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i seeo emerging all around me. e. the book is really kind of a series of stories about these people are trying to change ther world and trying to advance the cause of progress. ban but they don't completely fithei the existing models that we have between the left and the right or the democrats and right republicans. democrats and repub. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve capitalism or big corporation. so when you believe in a system come you don't necessarily believe in the traditional anchors that the left are traditional anchors at the right. so i felt th
and intellectual property and u.s. global awareness and cohesion, please join me in welcoming the panelists to discuss this disturbing an important report. [applause] >> thank you. >> you can sit next to me. [applause] e-mail welcome to this evening in the broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament of two things. one is how this issue of education reform has been a combination of talent that we see in this room and how it has coalesced around this issue of new technologies. that there really is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i'm a great believer that two things matter. one is ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change. it is the driver of history. this includes the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. this is one of them. so again, the fact that you are all here is the greatest. condoleezza rice and i come out of the national security background. when we were youngsters, we used to mess around with iran bomb calculator. and he used to calculate what was known as the circular err
of your affection. [applause] >> thank you. i was interested in architecture. i used to look at the cathedral's because of how beautiful they are and how serene, the but i very quickly became interested in how they were built. when you look at one of those european cathedrals you do think how did people get those enormous homes? beauvis had no power tools, know mathematics for constructing cranes and so on, and so i became interested in how it was done and eventually became interested in the society that produced the great cathedrals and the question that strikes anybody is why are they there so i became fascinated by that and quite early on in my career when i was still struggling to make it as a writer i had a go at writing a novel about building a cathedral. i felt jerry convinced it was a great popular novel to be written in the cathedral in about 1976, i wrote a few chapters on an outline and i sent them to my agent. he didn't like it at all and he was right and he said you are writing a tapestry and what you need is a series of linked melodrama. the truth of the matter
for witnesses four witnesses to help us examine how this could have happened. i am very eager to hear from the fda and also the massachusetts board of registered pharmacies with authority over necc at just how we got here. i would like to hear about how on earth his company could have been so irresponsible, causing the death of so many americans. i am looking forward to hearing from joyce lovelace, who is the wife of one of the first victims in this tragedy. i want to join with expressing my deep sadness for your loss. i really want to thank you today. congressman, thank you so much. i know this is hard for you, but it's important. the owner failed to ensure that the necc follow safety guidelines again and again. reports of problems were brought to the attention of the massachusetts board of registration of pharmacy, which failed to act. they were informed of problems and complaints even from its own inspections in 1999, 2002, 2003, 2004, and even this past summer. somehow, necc was able to keep its license and avoid significant penalties and continue its operations until tragedy struck al
that makes us distinct from the united states. whereas in canada, the united states, you say go west to find your identity. in this country, it has always been go north. that is the part of the country that defines our identity and has so much promise in terms of its abundant resources. i do want to say this -- one of the things we tried to do as a government, with some success, is we come to office with two views but too often in the past, we're seeing. one is that this government is extremely pro-american. the valiant the relationship with the united states. we could not be in a better situation than to have the united states as our only real labor, closest economic partner and oldham of the allied. -- and ally. at the same time, we're strong canadian nationalists and think in our own modest way.we see no incompatibility with that. but we attrited did -- what we tried to do is say there is no need for canadianism to have anti-americanism. because of what does happen in the global economy. let's marry those two things. recognize the states powerful country that should not be a basis of rese
and ranking member mccain for their patience and persistence in allowing us to get to this vote. i think once i discuss the bill for a moment, it might not seem like it required much patience to get here but it did. i appreciate it. the history of this amendment is it began as a bill in the senate. this bill passed out of the health, education, labor and pensions committee unanimously, by unanimous consent. an identical bill passed through the house of representatives under suspension. so in many respects it is noncontroversial. i want to also thank while i'm here chairman harkin and ranking member enzi of the help committee for their help getting it through the help committee unanimously and for clearing it for a vote here today on the floor. the bill has at this point nearly 60 cosponsors. it has 18 republican cosponsors. and i wish to thank them individually and by name. senators blunt, boozman, brown of massachusetts, chambliss, cochran, collins, crapo, grassley, heller, hutchison, isakson, kirk, lugar, moran, murkowski, rubio, snowe, and wicker, in addition to all of my democratic cospon
some cures and some scientific breakthroughs, like jim was talking about, that would move us beyond just saying we're going to have to cut medicare by $10 trillion over the next 50 years. >> i'm going to let jonathan respond and then i will let each panelist say when prediction on what they see ahead. jonathan. >> the question becomes do people want to work together. and politically if we think we can do better by opposing everything, you oppose everything. and politically think you can do better by working out deals the way gingrich and republican-led congress worked out deals with bill clinton. they will work that. as a matter of both sides willing to come to the table and give-and-take. >> so that was a very fast. like a journalist. version of what's going on. stand, predictions? >> i think the surprise -- surprise. maybe what happens with health care. health care reform and implantation of health care reform. because we talked about this as if there isn't other people. there are so many people who are in either in the process of or have to make decisions about going forward on h
most powerful democrat in washington have to use his chief of staff as a lever to send a message to the president of the united states? i was talking to somebody from the other day. as you may know, they take books and they divide them as red states and blue states. most of the books selling in red states, republican state, blue state, democratic states, and i have said, where does this football? where is it to and he said well, it's purple. because it has information about both sides in all of us. it shows that there is a war going on, not just in the democratic party, but the republican perhaps much more intense. john boehner is trying to work a deal with the president to do tax reform and entitlement reform and his deputy, the majority leader, calls people like paul ryan, who is now running for vice president. .. >> if you keep doing this, you are going to risk your speakership. the president said when i talked to him, interestingly enough, he said in fixing -- he realizes the magnitude of all of this, as does speaker boehner, key democrats, key republicans realize
the textbooks used in schools. unfortunately, they tend to write for each other rather than the rest of us, rather than certainly students in the classroom and that's what i see my role as a second exhibit is a teacher. getting people to explore the questions they might have and may be afraid to ask, pointing them in every direction so that i i think are accurate and useful information and hoping they move on from there. all of my boat from don't know much about history to my new one, "don't know much about the american presidents" contain less of must-read books, others they think are significant and long lists of books i used in terms of the reference and resource in research. >> host: you are watching and listening to booktv on c-span 2. this is our monthly "in depth" program. we invite one author to talk about his or her body of work and this month its kenneth davis, author and historian. here is a list of mr. davis' book's beginning in 1984 with the paper backing of america, they don't know much series started in 1991. about history was the first, don't know much about geography in 19
remember things differently. the tapes themselves gives us remarkably unrehearsed, unscripted theater what was happening. but i've tried to do is filter the zen with all these other sources. >> host: david, thank you very much. i urge you want to read the book and later look at the context in this transcripts of these tape recordings as they come out of the next year. thank you very much. >> guest: thank you. >> one of the things you read and learn about other children of alcoholics in that family dynamic is a childlike bill clinton begins to feel like he has the responsibility of appealing to that family conary teaming, creating on her with various dishonor. he basically said that to be the person who's going to rescue the family. he's an incredible student, front of his class. he becomes active in worst nation, a junior at american region, gets nominated to go to washington as a quote, unquote nation candidate for u.s. senate. goes to washington. he's 36 feet tall. he strives to the front of the line when they go to the white house to see president kennedy kennedy finishes h
, especially they used beans. [laughter] in san francisco there was a black-tie dinner in honor of a queen and prince philip at the museum. watching the clock, he asked the queen's private secretary, sir philip morris, why she was taking so long to get ready. the queen needs heard tiara time , he replied he then explained that she has a kayten with tools that she uses to decorate certain crs by hooking on paroles or rubies or sapphires for emeralds depending on what she is wearing. when i asked the crown jeweler, david thomas about this he said that it is, in fact, a pastime that she very much enjoys. the queen and prince philip had an easy camaraderie with george h. w. bush and his wife, barbara in part because they were all close contemporaries. philip and the 41st president had also both seen action in the pacific in world war ii, which give them a common bond. the queen is rather formal, bush told me, but i never found per reserved, standoffish. it is hard to explain really, but she is a very, very easy to be with. conversation comes easily. that ease was evident after the white house
really reading the sample -- i think it will result in us in a change of writing digital. i think it was surprising to me that we talked about the different kinds of things, talking about the writing experience and i think many of us, because of digital are becoming writers and i think the result, we are reading in a whole new way. i was wondering if there was psychology that relates to that. .. i am wondering myself what we do as writers to meet that. that is another challenge. [laughter] >> one, i think you are right and i think the question had a lot of information in it. we have all become writers and we have been pushed into it by communication and we are all publishers to a large degree and to mitigate largely through text and increasingly through video and instagram but still videos. the only actual thought i have, i don't have a direct answer but there is another thought that contributes to the world you are talking about and that is what is the role and responsibility of the delineation of the writer versus the person previously known as the reader? there has been and bir
the use beans. in san francisco, there was a black-tie dinner in honor of the queen and prince philip at the d on memorial museum. watching the clock, mike deaver asked the been's private secretary why he was taking so long to get ready. the queen needs her tiara, more replied. he explained she has a kit with tools that she uses to decorate certainty ares by hooking on pearls or rubies or sapphires or emeralds depending on what she is wearing. when i asked the crown jeweler david thomas about this, he said it is in fact a pastime that she very much enjoys. the queen, prince philip had an easy camaraderie with george h. w. bush and his wife barbara in part because they were all close contemporaries. the 40 first president, they had both seen action in the pacific in world war ii which gave them a common bond. the queen is rather formal, bush told me, but i never found her reserve standoffish. it is hard to explain really. but she is very easy to be with. conversation comes easily. after the white house welcoming ceremony for her third state visit in 1991 when presidential aides forgot
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)